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Powering Consumers
and Empowering Communities
725
Customers & Supporters
4100
Dollars donated to nonprofit partners
290
Hours spent volunteering
Every single day billions of people around the world use energy in a variety of ways at home, at work and all over our communities. By now, the energy transaction has become a necessary, an inevitable fact of life.
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Commercial
Every single day billions of people around the world use energy in a variety of ways at home, at work and all over our communities. By now, the energy transaction has become a necessary, inevitable fact of life that is in many places taken for granted and very rarely seen as exciting. We flick the switch, the bulb flickers on and each month we pay the bill.
Residential
Link Energy wants to add more value to our customer’s energy consumption. We annually donate a set portion of our profits to pre-selected non-profit community organizations in the areas we serve. As a Link Energy customer, you are helping to create a better life for the people and communities impacted by our business while benefiting from competitive and stable rates for your energy.
introduction
Every single day billions of people around the world use energy in a variety of ways at home, at work and all over our communities. By now, the energy transaction has become a necessary, inevitable fact of life that is in many places taken for granted and very rarely seen as exciting. We flick the switch, the bulb flickers on and each month we pay the bill. Link Energy wants to add more value to our customer’s energy consumption. We annually donate a set portion of our profits to pre-selected non-profit community organizations in the areas we serve. As a Link Energy customer, you are helping to create a better life for the people and communities impacted by our business while benefiting from competitive and stable rates for your energy. Business is changing and companies must adapt to the reality that many consumers are increasingly shopping in accordance with their morals. Link Energy is happy to adapt to this reality and hope to prove the merits of the idea that making money and doing good are not mutually exclusive objectives, but in fact, they work together. “The more business we do the more good we can do”. We want to share this strategy with our commercial customers and encourage them to adopt similar strategies. In that spirit, Link Energy provides its customers with marketing and recognition of their impacts, which they can proudly display to their customers in their place of business.
options
linkflex

The Variable Link Flex Price Plan will enable you to follow the market in pursuit of advantageous pricing in the long term and minimize the risk of locking a rate when prices are at relative highs.

With more flexibility and easier exit conditions, this product suits individuals who are not risk averse.
linkfirm

The Fixed Link Firm Price Plan will protect your energy budget and bottom line from the risk of price spikes or higher energy rates.

We will help you find the right fixed rate plan with transparent contracting details so that the product aligns with your future load changes and budgeting objectives.
GET A QUOTE NOW
frequently asked questions.
  • How do I qualify to enroll with Link Energy?
  • What happens if I move?
  • Who benefits from your services?
  • How does Link Energy select their nonprofit partners?
  • How do Link Energy customers stay informed about contributions in their community?
  • Why Link Energy does not provide additional savings instead?
  • Can I opt out of the program?
  • What are the payment options?
  • How do I access my account?

In order to qualify for any program, you must meet all of the following criteria:

  • Over the age of 18
  • Is the account holder of a utility
  • Have a valid service and billing address
  • Meet the credit requirements

Let us know a minimum of 45 days before you move by providing your new service address.

If the new location is within a territory Link Energy serves, your contract will be amended and applied to the new location. Any costs associated with the interruption in supply of energy or services due to the failure to notify us of a change of address, will be charged to the client’s account. If you are moving out of a territory Link Energy serves, the contract will terminate in accordance with the provisions set out in the terms and conditions related to your particular product as of the date you move. To learn how to change your service address via your online account, click here.

Our customers and community! Link Energy offers you a service you can be comfortable with. In additional, we partner with a limited number of local non-profits making a difference in your community. Half of our donation pool is split evenly between our non-profit community partners and the other half is distributed to them in accordance with the votes of our customers.

We research and review potential nonprofit partners to play our part in creating a better life for the people and communities touched by our business.

The criteria that are important to us include the following:

Lean Operational Structure: A transparent organization possessing lean structures where a majority of donation revenue is directed towards the provision of services.

Direct Impact: An organization having a direct impact by making a difference in the communities it serves.

Solid Reputation: A highly regarded organization continuously playing a big part in creating a better life for the people and communities.

We want to focus our attention on a select number of nonprofit partners to ensure our efforts in helping each partner will be significant.

Please read our NonProfit Policy and our Donation Policy.

Link Energy customers receive a quarterly newsletter with their bill showcasing one of our nonprofit partner who is taking the lead in contributing to a better everyday life for their people and communities. Link Energy will also publish donation receipts on their website for each full calendar year of operations.

Link Energy has set an industry standard profit margin that produces a highly competitive price to our clients. The amount donated comes directly from that profit margin. Our competitive rates remain unchanged by the donations made as we aim to increase our market share. As a direct result, the more business we do the more good we can do.

Link Energy customers can cancel at any time with a 30 days notice in writing. Should a customer opt to cancel a Link Firm program, there will be an Early Exit Fee between $50-150 per site, per year, depending on which type of contract is being terminated and which jurisdiction the customer is located in. To learn how to cancel via your online account, click here.

Link Energy accepts cheque, online banking, pre-authorized debit (PAD) or credit cards. For more details on our payment options, click here.

Link Energy has an easily accessible online portal for all its customers. To follow a step-by-step tutorial on how to reach and navigate the online portal, click here.

introduction
Every single day billions of people around the world use energy in a variety of ways at home, at work and all over our communities. By now, the energy transaction has become a necessary, inevitable fact of life that is in many places taken for granted and very rarely seen as exciting. We flick the switch, the bulb flickers on and each month we pay the bill. Link Energy wants to add more value to our customer’s energy consumption. We annually donate a set portion of our profits to pre-selected non-profit community organizations in the areas we serve. As a Link Energy customer, you are helping to create a better life for the people and communities impacted by our business while benefiting from competitive and stable rates for your energy.
options
linkflex

The Variable Link Flex Price Plan will enable you to follow the market in pursuit of advantageous pricing in the long term and minimize the risk of locking a rate when prices are at relative highs.

With more flexibility and easier exit conditions, this product suits individuals who are not risk averse.
linkfirm

The Fixed Link Firm Price Plan will protect your energy budget and bottom line from the risk of price spikes or higher energy rates.

We will help you find the right fixed rate plan with transparent contracting details so that the product aligns with your future load changes and budgeting objectives
GET A QUOTE NOW
frequently asked questions.
  • How do I qualify to enroll with Link Energy?
  • What happens if I move?
  • Who benefits from your services?
  • How does Link Energy select their nonprofit partners?
  • How do Link Energy customers stay informed about contributions in their community?
  • Why Link Energy does not provide additional savings instead?
  • Can I opt out of the program?
  • What are the payment options?

In order to qualify for any program, you must meet all of the following criteria:

  • Over the age of 18
  • Is the account holder of a utility
  • Have a valid service and billing address
  • Meet the credit requirements

Let us know a minimum of 45 days before you move by providing your new service address.

If the new location is within a territory Link Energy serves, your contract will be amended and applied to the new location. Any costs associated with the interruption in supply of energy or services due to the failure to notify us of a change of address, will be charged to the client’s account. If you are moving out of a territory Link Energy serves, the contract will terminate in accordance with the provisions set out in the terms and conditions related to your particular product as of the date you move. To learn how to change your service address via your online account, click here.

Our customers and community! Link Energy offers you a service you can be comfortable with. In additional, we partner with a limited number of local non-profits making a difference in your community. Half of our donation pool is split evenly between our non-profit community partners and the other half is distributed to them in accordance with the votes of our customers.

We research and review potential nonprofit partners to play our part in creating a better life for the people and communities touched by our business.

The criteria that are important to us include the following:

Lean Operational Structure: A transparent organization possessing lean structures where a majority of donation revenue is directed towards the provision of services.

Direct Impact: An organization having a direct impact by making a difference in the communities it serves.

Solid Reputation: A highly regarded organization continuously playing a big part in creating a better life for the people and communities.

We want to focus our attention on a select number of nonprofit partners to ensure our efforts in helping each partner will be significant.

Please read our NonProfit Policy and our Donation Policy.

Link Energy customers receive a quarterly newsletter with their bill showcasing one of our nonprofit partner who is taking the lead in contributing to a better everyday life for their people and communities. Link Energy will also publish donation receipts on their website for each full calendar year of operations.

Link Energy has set an industry standard profit margin that produces a highly competitive price to our clients. The amount donated comes directly from that profit margin. Our competitive rates remain unchanged by the donations made as we aim to increase our market share. As a direct result, the more business we do the more good we can do.

Link Energy customers can cancel free-of-charge at any time with a 90 days notice in writing. If the customer wishes to cancel immediately, a $50 charge will incure. To learn how to cancel via your online account, click here.

Link Energy accepts cheque, online banking, pre-authorized debit (PAD) or credit cards. For more details on our payment options, click here.

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Social Commitment

Our Initiative

We want to play our part in creating a better life for the people and communities touched by our business. This has always been part of our approach, and it is even more important today as our business continues to grow.

Link Energy is committed to donating a set amount to a donation pool that will be distributed once per year at the beginning of each calendar year. Distribution is made in accordance with the following formula: 50% of the donation pool in each region is divided evenly amongst all of the selected nonprofit partners in that area. The remaining 50% of the annual donation pool is distributed to nonprofit partners in accordance with the votes of Link Energy customers.

Link Energy is committed to prove that the energy industry can be a force for positive change in the world. Our ambitious strategy is actually going to pay dividends and be profitable through increased customer selection, referrals and loyalty. We are here to make the energy transaction more interesting than simply flick a switch and pay a bill.

Find out more:
How Link Energy made a difference in the communities in 2014

How Link Energy made a difference in the communities in 2015

Social Commitment

How We
Contribute

Read our
DONATION POLICY.

Social Contribution

HOW
IT WORKS

When a customer signs up with Link Energy they will select an energy product and choose one of the local nonprofit partners to support. At any time, Link Energy customers can change their nonprofit selection through the online billing portal or by sending an email to our customer service team.

Partner
Relations

Link Energy researches and reviews potential nonprofit partners to play our part in creating a better life for the people and communities touched by our business.

The criteria that are important to us include the following:
Lean Operational Structure:
A transparent organization possessing lean structures where a majority of donation revenue is directed towards the provision of services.
Direct Impact:
An organization having a direct impact by making a difference in the communities it serves.
Solid Reputation:
A highly regarded organization continuously playing a big part in creating a better life for the people and communities.

We want to focus our attention on a select number of nonprofit partners to ensure our efforts in helping each partner will be significant.

Our Partners

We are dedicated to researching and choosing non-profit organizations that can have a direct impact on the communities in which they operate. We are proud to have partnerships with the non-profit organizations listed below.

Read non-profit policy
Alberta
Calgary Food Bank

The Calgary Food Bank is a community owned non-profit organization focused on helping needy members of their local community. The food bank provides produce via several programs such as the milk program – a milk and baby formula delivery service to expecting mothers and babies in income households.
Read more

Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (CWRS)

Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society (CWRS) is a non-profit organization established in 1993 and is the only veterinarian based wildlife hospital within the city of Calgary. The CWRS has been rescuing injured wildlife and providing the care needed to get them back to a healthy state so that they can be released into their natural habitat while providing educational services to the community.
Read more

Edmonton Food Bank

The Edmonton Food Bank provides for the most fundamental human needs to some of the most vulnerable members since January 1981. This non-profit partner has played a major role in assisting the Edmonton community by working with more than 210 agencies, churches and food depots.
Read more

Edmonton Meals On Wheels

Edmonton Meals on Wheels have been providing meal services within their community since 1969. This non-profit organization caters to the diverse mix of needs in their local community. They have been providing both hot and frozen home delivered meals to some of the most vulnerable members of the Edmonton community.
Read more

Hull Services

Hull Services was established in 1962 to provide leading edge and effective behavioral and mental health services for children and families. They have developed programs that focus on these issues for both their clients as well as their families. Hull Services is committed to help the most vulnerable members of society get a fighting chance at a productive life.
Read more

Ontario
Fort York Food Bank
The Fort York Food Bank (FYFB) offers integrated services focused on reconnecting people with our community. FYFB seeks to provide the basic nutritional requirements to individuals and families in need. In addition, FYFB helps people get on track by providing counselling, training and advocacy to help people find jobs, safe housing and appropriate social/community programs. Read more
Eden Community Food Bank

The Eden Community Food Bank works to be a place where everyone can be a part of a community focused on good food. Through their food bank, the Eden Community Food Bank provides access to nutritionally balanced groceries. Their kitchen programs teach people the skills and knowledge to provide healthy meals. Read more

Meal Exchange

Meal Exchange works with over a third of the universities in Canada, and has programs running in over 100 communities across the country. Their goal is to support students to develop innovative solutions to address hunger, food insecurity and sustainability on their campuses and with communities. In addition, they provide students with mentorship and resources, and connect them with their peers and stakeholders across the country. Learn more

Deregulation

deregulation
explained

A deregulated energy market allows competitive energy suppliers to enter markets to offer their services to consumers. Beforehand, the choice of supplier was typically limited to a local utility company. Once a market deregulates, energy retailers like Link Energy have been able to innovate and design products and services to better meet the needs of customers. Now, consumers can choose their supplier based on the products and values they relate to.

What does deregulation
mean for you?

Your local utility provider will continue to distribute energy to your home or business. The benefit of a deregulated market is that you can choose a supplier that will give you the power to set the terms of your energy service. Depending on the area you live, you can either receive your bill from Link Energy or from your local utility provider. There will be no service interruptions, just the peace of mind that comes with choosing Link Energy for the services and commitment to make a difference in your community.

PriceVolatility

The prices of natural gas and electricity are influenced by a variety of factors that are typically beyond the control of most customers. These prices are especially important since most, if not all, customers depend on these products to operate their homes and businesses. Customers need protection in a volatile energy market and Link Energy products can give customers the security they deserve.

Energy prices fluctuate based on changes in supply and demand. When energy supply increases, prices tend to go down and when there is a shortage, prices go up. When demand for energy increases, prices increase and when it decreases, prices tend to fall.

Seasonal and abnormal weather

Seasonal and abnormal weather play a major role in the demand for electricity and natural gas. Very cold or very hot weather will cause people to increase their use of heating and cooling equipment, which are major sources of energy demand and consumption.

Economic
activity

Economic activity also influences demand for energy. Heavy industrial consumers can drive demand and consumption up significantly so when a region is producing lots of goods and services or extracting and processing raw materials this will play an important role in the demand for energy in that region and thereby the price.

Supply
availability

Supply availability can affect energy prices. A majority of the energy we use is generated from fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas since this is generally the least expensive form of energy generation. However, when there is a shortage of these fossil fuels, other more expensive forms of energy generation will need to be used resulting in higher energy prices.

Electricity

Electricity is a convenient form of energy that we use every day. It is a secondary energy source as it is generated from the conversion of primary sources of energy, such as fossil fuels (coal, natural gas and oil), nuclear power and renewable sources (wind, hydro, solar, geothermal).

Fossil fuels are burnt using turbines or engines, which produce heat, when combined with steam and ultimately generates electricity. Natural gas is a clean burning fossil fuel and has often been used to replace coal-fired generation. Historically, generation from fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas was amongst the least expensive options and thereby has been the most commonly chosen form of electric generation. However, recent changes in environment regulations have led to an increasing reduction in our reliance on coal-fired generation.

Hydroelectricity uses dams to power turbines that create electricity. Hydroelectric generation can also be relatively cost effective but this source of generation is obviously limited by the number of suitable waterways. The price of hydroelectric generation will also be influenced by the price of competing sources of generation in the marketplace.

Nuclear fission is used to split atoms and harness the energy released to generate heat and electricity. Nuclear generation is influenced by the price of raw materials and the high cost of building and maintaining a nuclear generator. Changes to regulations also play an important role in the cost of nuclear generation.

As the sun's rays and wind blows, electricity is generated in new forms whose cost is still often seen as prohibitive. This impedes the development of mass scale projects of the type that could replace the electrical generating capacity of a more conventional station. The cost of these technologies is steadily decreasing. Regulations also play an important role in the costs of these types of generation.

Natural Gas
Natural gas is a colorless and odorless gas in its pure form, composed of mainly methane. It is drilled from the ground through a number of techniques. Most commonly natural gas is drilled by conventional vertical drilling. Supply of natural gas is limited although new discoveries and technological innovations make it possible to extract more gas.
Gas can now be brought up by horizontal drilling that more recently has been combined with hydraulic fracturing. All of these drilling practices are subject to regulatory scrutiny and in the case of hydraulic fracturing this scrutiny has intensified recently as environmental and media groups have called attention to what they believe are dangerous potential by-products of this practice. Regulatory changes in this area will also influence the price of this product.
EnergyTerms

Adjustment Bid: A bid that is used by the Independent System Operator (ISO) to adjust supply or demand when it is anticipating congestion on the transmission system.

Aggregator: Any marketer, broker, public agency, city, county, or special district that combines the loads of multiple end-use customers to facilitate the sale and purchase of electric energy, transmission, and other services on behalf of these customers.

Baseload: The minimum amount of electric power delivered or required over a given period of time at a steady rate.

Baseload capacity: The generating equipment normally used to serve loads on an around-the-clock basis.

Baseload plant: A plant, typically comprised of high-efficiency steam-electric units, that normally generates all or part of the minimum load of a system and that produces electricity at an essentially constant rate, running continuously. These units are operated to maximize system mechanical and thermal efficiency and minimize system-operating costs.

Broker:An entity that arranges the sale and purchase of electric energy, transmission, and other services between buyers and sellers, but does not take title to any of the power sold.

Bundled utility service: All generation, transmission, and distribution services—including ancillary and retail services—provided by one entity for a single charge.

Capacity charge: An element in a two-part pricing method used in capacity transactions (energy charge is the other element). The capacity charge, sometimes called “Demand Charge,” is assessed on the amount of capacity being purchased.

Commercial sector: The commercial sector is generally defined as non-manufacturing business establishments, including hotels, motels, restaurants, wholesale businesses, retail stores, and health, social, and educational institutions. Utilities may classify their commercial service/rates as all consumers whose demand or annual use exceeds some specified limit. The limit may be set by the utility based on the rate schedule of the utility.

Customer charge (“service charge”): Part of the utility’s monthly distribution charge to cover the basic administrative activities with maintaining a customer account, including billing, meter reading equipment, service line maintenance and equipment (a regulated charge).

Demand: The rate at which energy is delivered to loads and scheduling points by generation, transmission, and distribution facilities.

Deregulation (restructuring): The process of replacing a monopoly system of electric utilities with competing sellers, allowing individual retail customers to choose their electricity supplier but still receive delivery over the power lines of the local utility. It includes the reconfiguration of the vertically-integrated electric utility.

Distribution: The delivery of electricity to retail customers (including homes, businesses, etc.).

Electric service provider: An entity that provides electric supply to a retail or end-use

Electric utility: A corporation, person, agency, authority, or other legal entity that owns and/or operates facilities within the United States for the generation, transmission, distribution, or sale of electric energy, primarily for use by the public. Facilities that qualify as co-generators or small power producers under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) are not considered electric utilities.

Energy charge: That portion of the charge for electric service that is based on the electric energy (kWh) consumed or billed

Forced outage: The shutdown of a generating unit, transmission line or other facility for emergency reasons or a condition in which the generating equipment is unavailable for load due to unanticipated breakdown.

Fossil fuel: Any naturally-occurring organic fuel, such as petroleum, coal, and natural gas. A fossil fuel electricity plant uses coal, petroleum, or gas as its source of energy.

Fuel expenses: Expenses from the fuel used in the production of steam or driving another prime mover for the generation of electricity. Other associated expenses include unloading the shipped fuel and handling of the fuel up to the point where it is used.

Futures market: A trade center for quoting prices on contracts for the delivery of a specified quantity of a commodity at a specified time and place in the future. This futures market is a standardized, exchange-traded, and government-regulated hedging mechanism.

Gas: A fuel burned under boilers and by internal combustion engines for electric generation.

Generating unit: Any combination of physically connected generator(s), reactor(s), boiler(s), combustion turbine(s), or other prime mover(s) operated together to produce electric power.

Generation (electricity): The process of producing electric energy by transforming other forms of energy. The amount of electric energy produced, expressed in watt hours (Wh).

Geothermal plant: A plant in which the prime mover is a steam turbine. The turbine is driven either by steam produced from hot water or by natural steam that derives its energy from heat found in rocks or fluids at various depths beneath the surface of the earth.

Greenhouse effect: The increasing mean global surface temperature of the earth caused by gases in the atmosphere—including carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, ozone, and chlorofluorocarbons (also known as greenhouse gases or GHGs). The greenhouse effect allows solar radiation to penetrate but absorbs the infrared radiation and returns it to space.

Grid: The layout of an electrical distribution system.

Heat rate: A measure of generating station thermal efficiency–generally expressed in Btu per net kilowatt hour. It is computed by dividing the total Btu content of fuel burned for electricity generation by the resulting net kilowatt hour generation.

Hedging contracts: Contracts that establish future prices and quantities of electricity, independent of the short-term market.

Henry Hub: A pipeline hub on the Louisiana gulf coast. It is the delivery point for the natural gas futures contract on the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX).

Hydroelectric plant: A plant in which the turbine generators are driven by falling water.

Independent power producers: Entities that are also considered non-utility power producers in the United States. These facilities are wholesale electricity producers that operate within the franchised service territories of host utilities and are usually authorized to sell at market-based rates. Unlike traditional electric utilities, independent power producers do not possess transmission facilities or sell electricity in the retail market.

Independent system operators (ISOs): Independent, federally-regulated entities that coordinate regional transmission in a non-discriminatory manner and ensure the safety and reliability of the electric system.

Industrial sector: The industrial sector is generally defined as manufacturing, construction, mining, agriculture, fishing and forestry establishments. The utility may classify industrial service based on demand or annual usage exceeding some specified limit. The limit may be set by the utility based on the rate schedule of the utility.

Intermediate load (electric system): The load range from baseload to a point between baseload and peak. This point may be the mid-point, a percent of the peak load, or the load over a specified time period.

Interruptible load: Refers to program activities that, in accordance with contractual arrangements, can interrupt consumer load at times of seasonal peak load by direct control of the utility system operator or by action of the consumer at the direct request of the system operator. It usually involves commercial and industrial consumers. In some instances the load reduction may be affected by direct action of the system operator (remote tripping) after notice to the consumer in accordance with contractual provisions. For example, loads that can be interrupted to fulfill planning or operation reserve requirements should be reported as interruptible load.

Investor-owned utility (IOU): A class of utility whose stock is publicly traded and who is organized as a tax-paying business—usually financed by the sale of securities in the capital market. It is regulated and authorized to achieve an allowed rate of return.

Line loss: refers to the volume of electricity that is lost to the system as electricity travels from source to load – the greater the distance, the greater the loss of electricity. Congestion and line losses cause the actual cost of delivering electricity to vary at various locations on the grid.

Load: The amount of electric power delivered or required at any specific point or points on a system.

Load shape: A method of describing peak load demand and the relationship of power supplied to the time of occurrence.

Market-based pricing (market-based rates): Electric service prices determined in an open market system of supply and demand under which the price is set solely by agreement as to what a buyer will pay and a seller will accept. Such prices could recover less or more than full costs, depending on what the buyer and seller see as their relevant opportunities and risks.

Net generation: The amount of generation less the electric energy consumed at the generating station for station use.

Non-utility power producer: A corporation, person, agency, authority, or other legal entity that owns electric generating capacity and is not an electric utility. Non-utility power producers include qualifying co-generators, qualifying small power producers, and other non-utility generators (including independent power producers) without a designated franchised service area.

Nuclear power plant: A facility in which heat produced in a reactor by the fissioning of nuclear fuel is used to drive a steam turbine.

Off-Peak: A period of relatively low system demand that can occur in daily, weekly, and seasonal patterns and that can differ for each individual electric utility.

On-Peak: A period of relatively high system demand that can occur in daily, weekly, and seasonal patterns and that can differ for each individual electric utility.

Outage: The period during which a generating unit, transmission line, or other facility is out of service.

Peak demand: The maximum load during a specified period of time.

Peak load: The amount of power required to supply customers at times when the need is the greatest.

Peak load plant: A plant usually housing old, low-efficiency steam units, gas turbines, diesels, or pumped-storage hydroelectric equipment that is normally used during the peak-load periods.

Peaking capacity: Capacity of generating equipment normally reserved for operation during the hours of highest daily, weekly, or seasonal loads. Some generating equipment may be operated at certain times as peaking capacity and at other times to serve loads on an around-the-clock basis.

Petroleum (crude oil): A naturally occurring, oily, flammable liquid composed principally of hydrocarbons. Crude oil is occasionally found in springs or pools but is usually drilled from wells beneath the earth’s surface.

Plant: A facility that houses prime movers, electric generators, and auxiliary equipment for converting mechanical, chemical, and/or nuclear energy into electric energy. A plant may contain more than one type of prime mover.

Power: The rate at which energy is transferred. Electrical energy is usually measured in watts. Also used for a measurement of capacity.

Power exchange: The entity that establishes a competitive spot market for electric power through day- and/or hour-ahead auction of generation and demand bids.

Pumped-storage hydroelectric plant: A plant that usually generates electric energy during peak load periods by using water previously pumped into an elevated storage reservoir during off-peak periods when excess generating capacity was available to do so. When additional generating capacity is needed, the water can be released from the reservoir through a conduit to turbine generators located in a power plant at a lower level.

Regulation: The governmental function of controlling or directing economic entities through the process of rulemaking and adjudication.

Reliability: Electric system reliability has two components—adequacy and security. Adequacy is the ability of the electric system to supply the aggregate electrical demand and energy requirements of customers at all times, taking into account scheduled and unscheduled outages of system facilities. Security is the ability of the electric system to withstand sudden disturbances, such as electric short circuits or unanticipated loss of system facilities. The degree of reliability may be measured by the frequency, duration, and magnitude of adverse effects on consumer services.

Renewable resources: Naturally, but flow-limited resources that can be replenished. They are virtually inexhaustible in duration but limited in the amount of energy that is available per unit of time. Renewable energy resources include: biomass, hydro, geothermal, solar and wind. In the future, they could also include the use of ocean thermal, wave, and tidal action technologies.

Reregulation: When new or additional regulations are enacted after an industry or sector is deregulated or the process of reversing deregulation in regions where deregulation turns out to be impractical or unmanageable.

Residential sector: The residential sector is defined as private household establishments which consume energy primarily for space heating, water heating, air conditioning, lighting, refrigeration, cooking and clothes drying. The classification of an individual consumer’s account, where the use is both residential and commercial, is based on principal use.

Restructuring: The process of replacing a monopoly system of electric utilities with competing sellers, allowing individual retail customers to choose their electricity supplier but still receive delivery over the power lines of the local utility. It includes the reconfiguration of the vertically-integrated electric utility.

Retail competition: The concept under which multiple sellers of electric power can sell directly to end-use customers and the process and responsibilities necessary to make it occur. A market environment in which customers can choose their own suppliers and service providers, and suppliers can choose to whom they wish to offer their services and how much they wish to charge.

Scheduled outage: When a generating unit, transmission line, or other facility, must be shut down for a scheduled inspection or maintenance.

Spot market: The hourly electricity market where prices can change from hour to hour based on the time of the day, supply, demand, trading prices, etc.

Spot purchases: A single shipment of fuel or volumes of fuel, purchased for delivery within one year. Spot purchases are often made by a user to fulfill a certain portion of their energy requirements, to meet unanticipated energy needs, or to take advantage of low fuel prices.

Steam-electric plant: A plant in which the prime mover is a steam turbine.

Sustainable energy: Energy from renewable resources that can meet the needs of the present as well as future needs. Sustainable energy resources include renewable sources such as biofuels, solar power, wind power, wave power, geothermal power and tidal power.

Transformer: An electrical device for changing the voltage of alternating current.

Transmission: The movement or transfer of electric energy over an interconnected group of lines and associated equipment between points of supply and points at which it is transformed for delivery to consumers, or is delivered to other electric systems. Transmission is considered to end when the energy is transformed for distribution to the consumer.

Transmission system (electric): An interconnected group of electric transmission lines and associated equipment for moving or transferring electric energy in bulk between points of supply and points at which it is transformed for delivery over the distribution system lines to consumers, or other electric systems.

Transmitting utility: A regulated entity that owns and may construct and maintain the wires used to transmit wholesale power. It may or may not handle the power dispatch and coordination functions. It is regulated to provide non-discriminatory connections, comparable service, and cost recovery.

Turbine: A machine for generating rotary mechanical power from the energy of a stream of fluid (such as water, steam, or hot gas). Turbines convert the kinetic energy of fluids to mechanical energy through the principles of impulse and reaction, or a mixture of the two.

Wholesale competition: A system whereby a distributor of power would have the option to buy its power from a variety of power producers and the power producers would be able to compete to sell their power to a variety of distribution companies.

Wholesale power market: The purchase and sale of electricity from generators to resellers (who sell to retail customers), along with the ancillary services needed to maintain reliability and power quality at the transmission level.

Contact
Link Energy Canada

39 Rivalda Rd
2nd floor
Toronto
Ontario
M9M 2M4

1-855-444-5465

1500 14 St SW
Suite 211
Calgary
Alberta
T3C 1C9

1-855-444-5465
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Link Energy’s
Privacy
Policy

We are committed to protecting the privacy of our clients, employees, contractors, and business associates. This policy explains how Link Energy collects, holds, uses, and transfers personal information in the course of its business. It also sets out individuals’ rights regarding their personal information that we hold. In this policy, the terms “we” and “us” refer to Link Energy Supply Inc., Link Energy, and Link Energy Flex collectively (hereafter referred to collectively as Link). Personal information is any information about an identifiable individual. This includes a person’s age, address, opinions, and financial details. However, the name, title, business address, and contact information of an employee in an organization are not personal information.
Principle 1: We are accountable for the personal information we control
Link Energy is responsible for the personal information controlled by it and its subsidiaries. We have appointed a Privacy Officer to protect personal information and ensure compliance with privacy laws. We have also established policies and procedures and trained our staff to protect personal information. If you have any questions about our privacy policy, you may contact our Privacy Officer at 1-855-444-5465 ext. 4.
Principle 2: We will tell you why we are collecting personal information at the time of collection
Link collects personal information from the persons we interact with in order to operate our business. These persons include: clients, employees, contractors, suppliers, our subsidiaries and government agencies. We collect information from potential and accepted employees and independent contractors for the purposes of:
  • Evaluating their suitability and employability
  • Providing pay and benefits
  • Assessing performance and compliance with company policies
  • Training and development
  • Complying with applicable laws
  • Beginning, maintaining, and ending the employment or contractor relationship
We collect information from current and prospective clients for the purposes of:
  • Delivering our products and services
  • Determining eligibility for products and services
  • Billing
  • Evaluating creditworthiness
  • Informing potential and current clients of business opportunities
  • Marketing and business development
  • Compiling sales leads
  • Complying with applicable laws
  • Utilizing a client as a reference for our services
  • If Link contemplates selling its business, disclosure to a potential buyer will be required but such information will be kept confidential
  • With your consent, any other reasonable use
  • With your consent, we may also share your personal information with energy suppliers and distributors in order to supply you with the energy that you have requested.
Principle 3: We will obtain your consent to collect personal information
In order to collect, use, or disclose your personal information we will obtain your informed consent. This consent may be obtained directly from you or through a third party if you have authorized that third party to give us your information. If we want to use your information for a new purpose that was not initially disclosed, we will need to get your additional consent for the new purpose.
What is consent?
Consent may be express or implied. We may obtain express consent over the phone or in writing. Our contracts with clients, employees, and independent contractors will contain a provision authorizing us to collect and use your personal information. We may obtain implied consent when given the circumstances; we can assume that you would agree to the collection and use of your personal information. For example, if you request a quote from us, we can assume that you have consented to our collection and use of the information necessary to produce the quote, such as your address and consumption volumes. Exceptions to the consent requirement: We may only collect or use your personal information without your consent if it is already publicly available. We may only disclose your personal information without your consent if we are required to do so by law or court order, the disclosure is made to our lawyer, our suppliers, the information is already publicly available, or in the event of a sale of Link’s businesses to a potential buyer. Withdrawal of consent: You have the right to withdraw your consent to our use of your personal information. However, we need your personal information to do business with you, so withdrawal of consent will likely cause the cancellation of any existing contracts between us and you, as well as any applicable financial consequences for early cancellation.
Principle 4: Limiting collection of personal information
We only collect the personal information that is reasonably required for the operation of our business.
Principle 5: Limiting use, disclosure, and retention of personal information
We collect personal information only for the purposes specified in Principle 2. If we want to use your personal information for a new purpose that was not disclosed when we obtained your consent, we will request your additional consent for the new purpose. Subject to the exceptions listed under Principle 3, we will not disclose your personal information to third parties without your consent. We will only retain your personal information for the amount of time that we reasonably require. We will retain personal information regarding clients, employees, and independent contractors for the length of any contract, plus a reasonable time following the end of the contract to allow us to comply with any contractual, legal, regulatory, or audit requirements. Following the end of this period, the information will be deleted or shredded.
Principle 6: Accuracy of personal information
It is necessary that the personal information we hold be as accurate as possible. To that end, we endeavor to keep our information accurate and make any necessary changes. We also encourage our clients, employees, contractors, and business associates to inform us of any changes in their personal information so that we may keep accurate records.
Principle 7: Safeguarding personal information
We will protect your personal information by using security measures appropriate to the information’s sensitivity. This will include physical measures such as locking filling cabinets, technological measures such as passwords, and organizational measures such as limiting access to those who need to know the personal information.
Principle 8: Openness
Link publishes its privacy policy on its website. Anyone who has additional questions about how we handle personal information may also contact our Privacy Officer at 1-855-444-5465 ext. 4.
Principle 9: You may access your personal information
You have the right to see your personal information that we possess and to be informed of how we have used the information and whether we have transferred it to any third parties. If you feel that your personal information that we hold contains errors, you may request that they be corrected. To access your personal information held by Link, you may make a written request to our Privacy Officer at customersupport@linkenergy.com or 4000 rue St-Ambroise Suite 398, Montreal Quebec H4C 2P3.
Principle 10: Challenging our compliance with this privacy policy
We will respond to any questions or complaints regarding this privacy policy and our handling of your personal information. Our privacy officer will investigate and attempt to resolve any complaint we receive. If you have any questions, wish to make a complaint, or want to withdraw your consent to our use of your personal information, please contact our Privacy Officer at 1-855-444-5465 ext. 4.

link energy
website
terms
of use

Terms of Use
Use of this website is subject to your compliance with these terms and conditions of use (“terms and conditions”). By accessing this website you agree to be bound by these terms and conditions. Link Energy Supply Inc., Link Energy, and Link Energy Flex collectively (hereafter referred to collectively as Link) reserves the right to modify these terms and conditions at any time without notice. It is your responsibility to regularly review theses terms and conditions.
Links to Third-Party Sites
Links to websites not under the control of Link are solely for the convenience of users. We are not responsible for the reliability, accuracy, or currency of information found on third party websites. Downloading of content from this website is at your own risk. Link does not guarantee that this website will be free from computer viruses. It is your responsibility to ensure that your computer systems are protected from computer viruses and compatible with our website. Link will not be held responsible for any damage to your computer systems or loss of data resulting from your accessing this website.
No Unlawful or Prohibited Use
As a condition of use of this website, you agree that you will not use this website for any purpose that is illegal or prohibited by the terms and conditions of use. You agree to comply with the laws of Canada and the laws of your local jurisdiction that apply to your use of this website.
Currency and Accuracy of Information
Link makes reasonable efforts to maintain the quality of information provided on this website. However, Link makes no warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, or currency of the information provided.
Disclaimer and Limitation of Liability
THE SITE AND THE CONTENT ARE PROVIDED "AS IS" WITHOUT WARRANTY OR CONDITION OF ANY KIND. USE OF THIS WEBSITE OR ITS CONTENT IS AT YOUR OWN RISK. LINK DOES NOT ASSUME ANY RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ERRORS, OMISSIONS OR INACCURACIES IN THE SITE OR ITS’ CONTENT. THE USER ASSUMES ALL RESPONSIBILITY FOR DAMAGES RESULTING FROM USE OF THIS WEBSITE. LINK DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, REPRESENTATIONS AND CONDITIONS OF ANY KIND WITH REGARDS TO THE WEBSITE AND ITS CONTENT WHETHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR COLLATERAL, TO THE FULLEST EXTENT PERMITTED BY LAW. IN NO EVENT WILL LINK BE LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES OF ANY KIND (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO DIRECT, INDIRECT, EXEMPLARY, PUNITIVE, LOSS OF PROFITS, LOSS OF DATA, OR OTHER LIABILITIES) RESULTING FROM THE USE OF OR INABILITY TO MAKE USE OF THIS WEBSITE OR ITS CONTENT.
Indemnity
You agree to defend, identify and hold harmless each of; Link, its affiliates and licensors, and each of their respective directors, officers, agents, and employees for any damages resulting from your breach of these terms and conditions or your reliance on or use of any information contained in this website. You agree to use your best efforts to cooperate with the resolution of any resulting claim. You further agree to give Link the sole control and defence of any claim, subject to your indemnification of any such claim.
Partial Invalidity
If any of these Terms and Conditions is held to be void, invalid, unenforceable or illegal, the other provisions shall continue in full force and effect. Communications with Us If you have any questions related to these Terms and Conditions, please contact Link at: 4000 Rue Saint-Ambroise, Suite 398 Montreal, QC H4C 2C7 Telephone: 1-855-444-LINK (5465) Email: customersupport@linkenergy.com
Copyright and Trademark Notices
All contents of this website are copyright 2014 of Link Energy Supply Inc. and the Link Energy logo are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of Link Energy Supply Inc. Names of other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. No part of this website or its content may be reproduced, copied, or transferred or modified without the prior written consent of Link energy Supply Inc., except to the extent of use that is personal and non-commercial.